Archive for the ‘landing pages’ Category

Feb 13
2013

Marry Google Analytics and Voice of Customer“I…i…i…i… I’m soooo in love with you… whatever you waaaant to dooo… it’s alright with meeeee…!” – lyrics from the “Reverend of Soul” himself – Al Green.

It’s Valentine’s Day, love is in the air! So, we thought we’d shoot cupid’s arrow through this next post about data and measurement. Give it some “love”, so to speak.

If you’re heavy into Google Analytics, you might be “infatuated” with quantitative data - “views”, “visits”, “bounces”, etc. – and…ahem…”RAW” numbers. That’s only one “better half” though. That is, it’ll tell you “what” is happening on your site. However, what about the other half – “why”??? One way to answer that question is by “marrying” your quantitative analytics data with qualitative, “voice-of-customer” survey data.

“Why… why do people break up? Then turn around and make up… I just can’t seeeeeeee….”

Let’s take a statistic of love. Unfortunately, it looks like approximately 50% of marriages fail :(   [Cupid, what the hec are you shooting at?] The Reverend of Soul, Al Green stated in his immortal lyrics, that he could see “what” was happening, but for the life of him, just couldn’t see “why” people break up!!!

This Valentine’s Day, let’s pretend to try to solve this urgent matter of the heart. WHY is this happening?! Is the aforementioned statistic enough for you to take action? Doesn’t look like it.

Those of you who’ve been through a tough time in your relationship know it’s not black and white – there could be a plethora of reasons:

  • You might have grown apart
  • Stresses like money could have strained the relationship
  • Infidelity
  • Communication could be missing
  • Etc.

As any counselor would tell you, they wouldn’t just diagnose “what” is going on in a couple’s troubled relationship, then right away present solutions. In order to solve the issues, they would go into several deep counseling sessions so they can get to the nitty gritty of “why” this is happening.

Similarly, diagnosing “what” the issues are with your website is only part of the process. Voice-Of-Customer qualitative surveys could potentially give you insight into “why”, insight that may not be readily apparent from quantitative data.

“Let’s Stay Together” – Putting Voice-Of-Customer Together with Quantitative Data

You have several ad campaigns leading visitors to a landing page asking them to register for your event. As the example figure below indicates, your analytics may be telling you that your landing page is getting all the traffic you’re paying for, from Facebook/Google Adwords campaigns, etc. You’re spending good money, and your micro conversion, say an agenda for your event, is getting all the downloads you want. But according to your data, the bounce rate is really high and no one is registering for your conference. Why?!

campaign metrics googel analytics

We recently ran into a similar situation with a project our consultants were assessing, and tried to figure out the issue:

  • Was there not enough sales information? We listed all the bullet points…
  • Did clients not trust the organization/service? We listed impressive certifications and testimonials…
  • Was the registration call-to-action button not clear enough? It’s big and yellow, and it looks like people are clicking on it according to our data…Just not completing registration

At this point, even if you had all the unsampled data in the world from Google Analytics Premium, you’d still be stuck. There’s always an option of implementing A/B testing, but that would take time and coding. Plus, what do you start testing? You can make educated guesses, but you’re pretty much taking shots in the dark (like cupid).

So even before we explored A/B testing, we tried implementing Qualaroo – an awesome, quick, non-invasive survey that quietly pops up based on criteria you set (ex. 30 seconds on the page, after 2 pages have been visited, etc.). You can ask any question – open-ended, multiple-choice, etc. And after each survey is complete, get reports in the native interface or download reports into .xls for deeper crunching.

So we asked – “Second thoughts about registering? Why?”

qualaroo survey voice of customer

Sample responses were as follows:
qualaroo survey results
As you can see from the responses (after ensuring we had enough replies for an acceptable confidence level/ statistical significance…), it was pretty much unanimous – pricing was the issue!

It would have been extremely hard to conclude that with just the quantitative data. We may have stumbled upon this after some A/B testing, however, after marrying the qualitative, it pointed us towards a pretty reliable direction in a quick and efficient manner. Even if we wanted to verify using A/B testing, we now have an idea of where to start.
They lowered the pricing and registrations started rolling in!

Conclusion

So when you’re having dinner by candlelight tonight, gazing into your lover’s eyes… slowly move in close, and whisper ever so gently… “My quantitative is incomplete without your qualitative…” <3

Nov 29
2011

 

landing page with bullseyeImagine you’re a used car salesman.  I know, you’re disgusted and feel like taking a shower now, but humor me.   A customer who has been searching for a Toyota Camry comes to your car lot because he saw your flashing sign for just that – a great deal on a Toyota Camry.   You tell him, “Sure!” and point him in the direction of the entire car lot.  “Find it yourself!”  Do you think you’ll close that sale?

How about imagine he walks through the lot with your Toyota deal in his mind, but you have salesmen calling him over trying to sell him BMW’s, Honda’s, KIA’s, etc.  Not only is your customer now annoyed that you made him search for the deal himself, you’re team is bugging him with promotions he’s really not thinking about or interested in.

Let’s say after that, your now annoyed customer sees a car lot next door, and ALL they sell are low priced Camry’s.  Who’s going to get that sale?

This is how you should be thinking about your site and competitors.    In particular, basic web usability theory says the internet make things so easy and convenient for us, that it’s trained us to be…well…lazy.  If you don’t make things as easy as possible for your visitors, your competitor will, and there is no penalty or price for your visitor pressing the “back” button and then clicking on your competitor.

10 Tips for Building Effective Landing Pages

The beauty of the internet now is that you can create targeted custom landing pages focused on closing one product or service without any distractions.  Landing pages are focused, eliminating confusion, putting your prospects into a “track” that hopefully will result in a lead or close.

In this post, I’d like to talk list some best practices on how to do that right.

1 ) Simplicity = Clarity.  This is a key point that not only web design and other media is based on in general,  but most of the landing page best-practices are based on this.   There is definitely a balance that needs to happen – all important information needs to be included – however, it’s important that information is succinct and that also there is no other fluff on the page that will distract the visitor from closing.  Hubspot (a great authority on internet marketing) calls this the “blink-test” – meaning it should be clear on the page (any web subpage) what the page is about within the first 5 seconds (before you blink).  How do you do this?  With clear headings, images, calls-to-actions and reducing all other distractions.

2 ) Maintain the Scent.  In many cases, your paid ads/email ads will be targeted and a landing page will be best to serve them, since the landing page can be focused specifically on what your ad/mail is talking about.  Like our Camry analogy, there’s nothing more annoying than coming to a page that says “Free Kindle!” but then all it says (and in fact is yelling), “Here’s a bunch of information that has nothing to do with that.”

Maintain the scent from your ad to your landing page
3 ) Headline.  In many cases, this is the first thing a visitor will see.  Make sure it maintains the scent of your ad if it’s from paid traffic.    Also, make sure it conveys what the page is about, whether it’s the name of your product, why they should purchase it, a promo you are offering, etc.   Again, internet surfers like to think as little as possible, if they scan your headings and don’t find what they’re looking for, there’s no penalty for them bouncing.

4 ) Salespoints.  Sounds obvious, but too many times we’ve come to a page and they dance around the main reasons why we should buy their product or contact them.  Understand your prospects, what they are looking for, what possible hesitations may stop them from taking advantage of your product/services.  Outline that then make sure it’s all included in your landing page.  Only thing to keep in mind is when you put them there, you don’t want to write a novel as to why visitors should buy.   Minimal, succinct words and phrases that best convey your ideas.

5 ) Clear Calls-To-Action.  Another one that sounds obvious.  Your design should clearly distinguish it’s call(s)-to-action.  It’s image should contrast (a bright button on a muted surface) or the link should be bright and big.  If there is only one clear button, and that’s the only place they can go, it increases their chances of them going there.   Also, minimize your calls-to-action and keep them above-the-fold (meaning it shouldn’t be at the bottom of the page where visitors have to scroll down to find it).  If your conversion element or call-to-action is a form, make sure it’s nice and big, stands out, and is above the fold.

6 ) No Escapes.    I want them to look at the rest of my site!  I want them to see what other services I provide!  I want them to see my Facebook page!  By them leaving this page that nurtures the lead, you are significantly risking them losing the sale.  Remove all escape elements from the page – no navigation, no social networks, no other offers.  In the case where they may want more information on your company, you may provide one hidden escape to again minimize the chance of them getting distracted an you losing the lead (maybe link your logo to your homepage), but make sure to open this page in another tab/window so the original offer/landing page is not lost.  If you want them to see your certifications, high-profile clients you’ve served, etc – include that in the actual landing page design and layout.

urchin landing page with call to action

7 ) Reduce Distractions.  Aside from actual link “escapes”, design can get in the way too.  Too many images, background patterns, textures, rotating information, etc – can distract a visitor from your main “track”.  You may need to include some of these things, but minimize it.  Simple backgrounds, simple images, simple colors.   You can still be simple and be aesthetically chic.

8 ) Credibility Badges.  Any certifications, testimonials, client logos, authority certifications of your business will help legitimize you and could refute apprehension by your visitors to convert on your landing page.  The nice thing is now that your landing page is simple, it has space for this information.

9 ) Test! In design, it’s always important to understand – best practices are just that – “best practices”.  They are not written in stone and may not always apply, or a tweak to them may further optimize them.   It’s great to have hypotheses of how your visitors will act on the page based on their marketing personas and to also follow best practicesthis is a great starting point.  However, you wont truly know how your page will perform until it goes live, and you wont know if it’s doing the best it can do till you test different strategies, layouts, designs. You can have different landing pages under different campaigns to test, conduct user-testing, or you can try A/B testing services such as the Google Website Optimizer.

10 ) Thank You Page UPSELL!  This is something everyone neglects (even until recently, so did we!) .  You just closed a lead!  You can place a plain thank you message, or further your business by putting a promotion on the thank you page, upsell other products you have, or even better, add a social “share” link so that your happy lead can share this info with their friends.  Word-of-mouth sales close significantly greater than cold leads.