Posts Tagged ‘mobile marketing’

Feb 01
2013

49er-mobileSuperbowl Sunday! GO NINERS!!!! Is mobile phone traffic on your site going to be the same during the game? During commercials? During halftime? In this post, we’ll show you how to figure that out!

Mobile is taking over! The ability to access the Internet from everywhere is so convenient – when you’re at the supermarket, gas station, even when you’re driving (don’t do that). Sometimes, I’m too lazy even open my laptop at home, it’s simpler to just pull out my mobile phone in front of my TV and connect.

And mobile use is only growing:

  • In 2013, more people use mobile than PC’s (Gartner 2011)
  • 50% of U.S. cell phone users have smartphones
  • 47% of consumers look up local information (for example, stores they want to visit)
  • 46% look up prices on a store’s mobile site
  • Etc.

(Statistics from rapidmarketplace.com)

Marketers who don’t start accounting for this trend will surely be left behind. The design and structure of your site, how your visitors use it, how visitors buy, etc. – is completely different on mobile devices vs. desktop – even vs. tablets. A mobile visitor is on the go, the screen is significantly smaller than a PC and tablet, it’s touch screen, etc. As a marketer, you need to be able to do dive deep and figure out exactly what’s going on to get insights unique to each.

Ideally, the following insights is what you want to see. You can see in this case that mobile phone and tablet behavior is different – tablet visitors are much more engaged, spend more time on the site, and view an average of one more page than phones:

Mobile Traffic Only Report - Google Analytics

“Mobile” (including Tablet)

It’s tricky. Google Analytics lumps tablets into the “mobile category”. But what if your design is responsive, and you have a different design for your mobile phone site vs. your tablet site? What if that’s impacting your traffic differently? You’ll need to separate the data.

Advanced Segment: Mobile Phones Only

Google already has a default segment to analyze ONLY “Tablet” traffic. But where’s the “Mobile Phone only” default segment? We love Google, but hint hint, cmon guys…

Have no fear – our resident analyst genius, @charlesfarina created a simple advanced segment to do this. Here’s how:

Step 1. Create a New Custom Advanced Segment
At the dashboard, choose Advanced Segment and click on “New Custom Segment”
Create advanced segment in google analytics

Step 2. Name Your Custom Segment
Name it something useful like “Phones”

Step 3. Include Mobile Traffic
Get all of mobile traffic, including Tablets and Mobile by selecting “Include” > “Mobile (including Tablet)” > containing “Yes”.

Step 4. Get rid of Tablet traffic
In order to separate mobile phones from tablets – you want [Mobile (which is mobile + tablets)] – [Tablet]
Add an “and” statement and “Exclude” > “Tablet” > containing “Yes”. This will get rid of tablet traffic.

Your advanced segment should look like this:
Mobile Phones Only Advanced Segment - Google Analytics

You are ready to slice and dice only mobile phone traffic!
Just in case, here’s a quick link for the segment http://goo.gl/TTCEM (so you can just save it to your profile automatically).

Jul 29
2010

With the creation of smart phones and since your mobile device is conveniently available anywhere, mobile internet browsing has increased astronomically. As such, users have come to expect better experiences on their phone. Unfortunately, not all sites have a mobile version, which is a problem since there’s a good chance your site will look significantly smaller and possibly illegible on a mobile device.

This should raise a couple questions:

  1. Is your site compatible on all cellular phone platforms?
  2. Is the site being used on a cellular phone the same way it would be used on a desktop?

If you aren’t sure, don’t guess; check your analytics. Here’s a post on how to track mobile traffic.

Issues with Mobile Usability

The answer depends ultimately on the function of your site but of course regardless, browsing a website on your mobile is a much different experience than browsing on your desktop. That said here are some usability issues you may run into while browsing on your mobile:

  • Excessive Scrolling – Phones have been getting smaller and sleeker over the past couple years, which means screens are even smaller. While the width of a standard desktop screen is around 1052px, the standard width for a mobile site is 250px. Unfortunately because of the small screen restriction, viewing a site is very frustrating because of scrolling and/or zooming in. I’ve run into this problem so many times, when I search on my blackberry, I always have to zoom into the site to be able to read, which of course means I have to scroll from right to left to read the content properly.
  • Load Time – Non-mobile-friendly sites could take a long time to load.
  • Page Height – Along with having to zoom, the page could be longer than necessary, causing the user to have to scroll down.
  • Flash – If your site has flash, more than likely it will not be supported by all cell phone browsers.
  • Mobile Location – Another factor affecting mobile browsing is location of the user. While computers are generally stationary, cell phones are used everywhere (hence the world “mobile”). The contrast of the colors and font size on a site may not be legible while using a cell outdoors.

Mobile Design Tips

Here’s a list of guidelines for designing a more-user friendly mobile site:

  1. Screen Size – Design your mobile site to be 250pxE-Nor Mobile
  2. Limited content – Since the width is limited, height may be used to fill in space that is lost with width. However, it’s best to avoid having a long page of content. After all, this is a phone and is still quite small. Whether its touch screen or keys based, it’s much harder to scroll up or down than it is on a desktop.
  3. Clear action buttons – Again, since the screen is small, it’s best to make sure if you do have images to make them clear, and if that means using the whole width that’s okay. Same goes for buttons, if there is a clear action, it will be seen, so the bigger the better. I highly recommend buttons over links; specifically for touch screen users. When trying to click on a link, it’s always so hard to actually click on the correct link. The link will usually be buried within text and other links.
  4. Create a separate mobile environment – administering a site that is optimized for a desktop that is at the same time 100% mobile friendly is very difficult since both natures are completely different. That would mean you’re essentially limited to the parameters of mobile (for example, when choosing the width of images for your desktop site, you’ll be nagged by the limits of your mobile resolution). It’s best to have a separate environment specifically catered to mobile screens allowing you to have freedom in both designs.
  5. Real Estate – Mobile “real estate” is very limited; to maximize the use of space in your design, simplify your site to the very basic functions of your company. For example, if your desktop has three panes; a side menu, content, and news. The side menu may not be completely necessary, especially since the navigation on mobile and desktop is completely different.
  6. Meet the user’s needs quickly – If the South Africa World Cup is the hot topic, and you’re cnn.com, make sure that story is visible above the fold right away.
  7. Clear functions – Make things clear and easy for the user to find. If you want someone to click on a button, make it large and bright to emphasize the action. For example, on a mobile site it would be smart to have a back button rather than a link because it’ll be easier for the user to find the button than a link since a link could easily get hidden through the text.
  8. Ease of use – The user shouldn’t have to waste time scrolling up and down looking for something that should be easy to find. For example, in tip #5, I talked about “real estate.” With a limited width, you lose a lot of space for content, but what you lose in width you can make up in the height. This makes it much easier for the user to read rather than having to scroll from left to right.
  9. Browsing Links – Use only basic browsing links such as home and back, you don’t need to include the whole menu that is on your desktop site. Make sure to add the browsing links at the top and bottom of the page.
  10. Search – For some sites, it is very important to have search because the site is search based for example, Google or Target. Google is search based links, while Target is search based products. If your site is search based, including two search boxes may be really helpful. Some companies have sites that are entirely search based such as Google, their desktop and mobile site is just a search bar. As for Target and Amazon their home pages have a search bar at the top of the page with browsing links below, which is another way to go because you can browse products as well as search for them.
  11. Testing – Lastly, make sure to test the usability of the mobile site on different phone browsers. This, of course, would be a separate checklist from launching your desktop site. Keep in mind, phones can be used in any location, for example, the contrast of a screen in the sunlight, has to be legible.

Having a mobile friendly site, will make it much easier for your customer to navigate, making for a better user experience, in turn, increasing your conversion. If mobile phones make shopping more convenient, you want to make sure your site takes advantage of that trend and make it easy for users to shop for your product as well.

And now that you have a mobile site, few things to keep in mind:

  • Search engine optimization (SEO), here is a link from the Google Webmaster tool on how to Help Google Index Your Mobile Site. Mobile websites are often returned in Google mobile search results (and other search engines too) in preference to non-mobile websites.
  • And once your mobile site is ready for prime time, you might want to drive qualified traffic through paid search (aka Pay-Per-Click) on Mobile, here are some ideas from the Google AdWords blog.
  • Last but not least, you gotta measure! A separate mobile website is easier to track on all devices than an integrated website where the tracking code might not run on all devices. Try Google Analytics for Mobile.

We’re in the process of practicing what we preach, so keep an eye out for the E-Nor Mobile Site! :)

References

For more info on mobile usability check out the following references:

Oct 20
2009

Marketers and analysts, are you ready for the latest version of Google Analytics!!! :)

As announced today on the Google Analytics blog and at eMetrics, the Google Analytics team is rolling out a new version of GA (version 4) with exciting new capabilities, many more customization options, and the totally awesome and super powerful Intelligence feature.

Over the next several days I’ll be posting specific posts about each of the new GA features, but for now here is a quick summary of what you’ll start seeing in your reports.

  • Expanded goals
  • Mobile reporting
  • Advanced table filtering
  • Unique visitor segmentation
  • Multiple custom variables
  • Sharing of custom segments and custom report templates
  • Intelligence
  • Automated and custom alerts

Please note that some of these features are rolled out as we speak (ok, it is past noon Pacific, 10/20/09 :) ), and others will be rolled out in the next few days or weeks.

More Power!

  • Goals and more goals! We have conveyed your requests to Google. You weren’t satisfied with 4 goals and now you can have up to 20; yes, 20 goals! Measure those important actions! In addition, you can now measure two engagement metrics, Time on Site and Pages per Visit.
  • Expanded mobile reporting. Not only you can track traffic from your iPhones, but now GA allows you to track mobile applications built for iPhone and Android devices (great way for application developers to measure engagement). In addition, traffic to mobile sites can be tracked (for sites built in PHP, Perl, JSP, ASPX), for devices with or without JavaScript.
  • Secondary dimensions and pivoting. Great table and filtering features. Check out our post on these here.
  • Unique Visitors Segmentation: now available across many dimensions in your Custom Reports. Answering the question of “how many actual visitors” got a little bit easier.

More Flexibility and Customization Options

  • Multiple custom variables. The requests of the analytics ninjas have been answered! Define an important interaction for your site and set a custom variable to track it. Tracking can be done at the page, session, and visitor level.
  • Sharing custom segments and custom report templates. If you can create them, you can now share them :) . It’s as easy as copying and pasting a URL.

Intelligence

  • Analytics Intelligence. This new feature is just great! Any time a tool can help automate the mundane and allows you to focus on the business, you gotta love it! This new report will provide automatic alerts when significant changes in your data occur, in daily, weekly and monthly intervals.
  • Custom alerts. You can create your own custom alerts and be notified by email or through the UI.

That is it for now. Log in to your GA account and check out some of these features and let us know what you think!

Oct 27
2008

Recently, Google released a new feature called Custom Reporting.

I would like to use this amazing feature in viewing a nice report for my last blog post, Tracking Mobile Devices in Google Analytics

  1. Click on Custom Reporting
  2. Click on “+ Create new custom report”
  3. Drag and drop desired fields into the blue and green boxes.
  4. Read and analyze your data.

Sep 09
2008
Today, people are more mobile and so is the Internet. People pay bills, read news, do shopping, and more using their mobile devices.

Website owners should be aware of this fact and design their sites to be mobile-device friendly.

The first questions a web analyst will be asked by website owners are: how many people visit my site using mobile devices, what is special about this segment of users, and what can I do to optimize my site for mobile device marketing?

Thanks to Google Analytics, answering these questions is as easy as 1, 2, and 3!

  1. Create a data filter to include only traffic from mobile devices.
  2. Create a profile and include the filter created in the first step.
  3. View data.

1. Create a new data filter to capture only traffic from mobile devices

  • Go to: Analytics Settings -> Filter Manager -> + Add Filter

  • In the “Filter Pattern” box, add the list of mobile devices you would like to include in your report separated by the pipe character | (Vertical Bar).

Note: Google Analytics can only track web browsers that execute JavaScript.

2. Create a profile (Ex. Mobile Devices)

  • Go to: Analytics Settings -> Add Website Profile.
  • Check the “Add a Profile for an existing domain” radio button.

  • Apply the filter created in step 1 – Mobile Devices Users – into this new profile

3. View data

Select the Mobile Devices profile. All of the data in this profile is now just for mobile devices’ visitors.