Posts Tagged ‘universal analytics’

Apr 02
2014

universal-analytics-thumb

Google Universal Analytics Officially Launches

The Google Analytics team announced today that Universal Analytics has officially launched out of beta! Read the official Google Analytics Blog post here.

What This Means for You

What does this mean for you? For one thing, Universal is now the only option for new accounts and properties, so essentially, Google Analytics has become Universal Analytics. Also, as very welcome news, Universal Analytics will now offer feature parity with Classic, so you can now take advantage of the Demographics & Interests reports as well as remarketing segments when you use Universal.

For Google Analytics Premium accounts, your SLA will now cover Universal.

Learning Resources

Linked below are several learning resources to help you transition to Universal and strengthen your overall Google Analytics skills.

We hope you find these resources useful as you migrate to Google Universal Analytics. If you have any questions or comments about the migration, please post below!

Mar 25
2014

google-analytics-universal-migration-flowchart
The global shift to Google Analytics Universal is upon us. Google plans to migrate everyone, and that can be a little scary. We want to make the migration as clear and seamless as possible for you.

The migration to Google Universal Analytics consists of two basic steps, but we need to keep aware of a few potential twists and turns along the way. The flowchart that appears below illustrates the timeline and decision paths that you’ll follow as you migrate your own Google Analytics properties to Universal.

The flowchart maps out the points discussed in the video that we posted last week, so you can now view the video, follow along in the flowchart, and read though our Universal ebook for a deeper dive into core Google Analytics functionality and Universal-specific considerations.

google-analytics-universal-migration-flowchart

Mar 18
2014

universal-analytics-thumb

Google is planning to roll out Universal to all Google Analytics accounts, and that might be a little scary. What does that mean for you?

Essential Guidance from an Early Adopter

E-Nor is proud to have had the opportunity to serve as early beta testers for Google Analytics Universal and also to partner with TiVo on a particularly interesting implementation of Universal to track the usage of their mobile app. We’ve also performed Universal implementations for a wide range of websites.

Since we have a little hands-on experience with Universal Analytics, we wanted to answer some important questions and outline steps you should be taking for a smooth transition. Below are some tips (along with a video from our principal consultant, Feras Alhlou) to make the migration a little more understandable.

Benefits of Migrating to Universal Analytics

Before we even get into the tips, what’s so great about Universal Analytics? Google has made some significant improvements in the evolution of analytics. For example, updates that might normally require changes in code can be done right from the Universal Analytics interface. Most notably, the system is evolving to support the multi-device/medium world we live in today – that is, tracking not only websites, but mobile apps and even allowing the import of offline data – so you can have a truly 360 degree view of all your engagement and marketing efforts.

While this post won’t explore the more advanced topics, the basic steps for Universal migration – outlined in the sections below (and in the video) – will allow you to take advantage of all features that Google Analytics Universal offers, now and in the near future.

1. Transferring your property to Universal Analytics Process Technology is DIFFERENT from upgrading your code.

As shown in our video, if you go to the admin section of your account, you may see a message from Google encouraging you to migrate your property. Also, under the settings for each property, you’ll see this:

universal-analytics-upgrade

This is simply asking you to upgrade your property to the Universal Analytics infrastructure. This will NOT affect your data. It’s just moving everything behind the scenes at Google to the new “processing technology”.

It might be a little confusing, but it’s necessary to understand that the Universal property transfer is different from upgrading your code and tags to Universal Analytics syntax, which eventually will be required. We’ll discuss that step later.

2. No immediate action is required (as of yet).

Although a full migration to Universal is recommended, you don’t actually have to take any specific steps for Universal right now. If you don’t upgrade your Google Analytics properties to the Universal infrastructure, Google Analytics will at some point do it automatically. However, if you want to go ahead, you can proceed by clicking the upgrade link in your property settings (shown in the picture above).

3. ga.js (Classic) tracking code will still work once my property is transferred to Universal (for now).

For now, ga.js will continue to track correctly, even if your properties have been automatically transferred to the Universal infrastructure. So your data will be fine and your tracking will still work.

Note: while Google Analytics may continue to support ga.js up to two years more, you don’t want to wait too long to upgrade your code to Universal Analytics, because at some point, ga.js will sunset and your data will no longer be recorded reliably.

4. You can replace ga.js (classic) with the analytics.js (Universal), but don’t forget some caveats!

You must upgrade your infrastructure for the new analytics.js code to work!
First, before you swap out ga.js for analytics.js, you must make sure to upgrade your corresponding Google Analytics property to Universal as described in tip 1 above. Although you can use the old tracking code with a Universal property (at least in the near future), you CAN’T use the NEW analytics.js tracking code with the CLASSIC infrastructure. Again, if you see the upgrade notice on the admin screen pictured above that says “transfer not started”, your property has not yet been transferred to Universal, so click on that and follow the steps if you want to use the new code.

If you initiate the transfer of your property yourself, you should wait 24-48 hours before switching to the analytics.js tracking code.

Update your tags’ syntax!
Also, at the same time that you switch to analytics.js, you must update any events, virtual pageviews, social actions, custom variables, and Ecommerce tracking that you have already coded for your site.

In the offsite link example below, an event is coded using Classic syntax:

<a href="http://www.anotherwebsite.com" onclick=" _gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'link', 'offsite', this.href]);">Another Website</a>

For Universal, you would need to revise the event as follows:

<a href="http://www.anotherwebsite.com" onclick="ga('send', 'event', 'link', 'offsite', this.href);">Another Website</a>

5. Subdomain tracking is supported, but cross-domain tracking needs code revision.

The Universal tracking code supports subdomain tracking without any revisions; you can use the default tracking code on two or more subdomains, such as www.mysite.com and blog.mysite.com.
To track across different domains, you need to make separate tracking code revisions on the different sites. For details, see E-Nor’s Google Analytics Guide: Best Practices for Implementation and Reporting.

6. Google Tag Manager: Replace the classic tag with the Universal tag.

If you’re using a Google Analytics classic code in Google Tag Manager to track your website pageviews, you can simply switch to a Google Analytics Universal code. However, as mentioned, don’t forget to update any other Google Analytics classic tags, such as for events and Ecommerce, that you may have added to your Google Tag Manager container. Third-party tag management systems should also provide the option of upgrading your Google Analytics tags to Universal.

7. New Implementation? Don’t waste time – go Universal!

If you’re tracking a new website, don’t waste time! Either with the native Google Analytics tracking code or through Google Tag Manager, choose the Universal option and join your fellow Web analysts as we march into the next generation of tracking.

On the Horizon: Enable the Demographics and Interests reports in Universal

While the Demographics and Interests reports are currently available only in Google Analytics classic, they should soon become available in Universal as well, at which time you can follow the instructions provided by Google.

Download Our Universal Analytics ebook!

Thanks for checking out the article. Hope it helps.
For more on Universal Analytics, click here to download our free ebook.


Download eBook

Jan 22
2014

Click here to download the ebook!

Tips! Getting customers through your website’s metaphorical doors is a tough mission! But keeping those visitors engaged once they’re on your site is an even tougher challenge. How do you leap these hurdles and create a site that customers both enjoy visiting and want to keep coming back to? This is a question all marketers and web analysts would LOVE to know the answer to. Unfortunately, it isn’t something that is easily determined with a one-size-fits-all answer.

So how do you measure your visitors’ engagement?

Ready for blast off?

Download our new eBook “Tracking Product Journey from Carting to Purchasing – 15 Secrets To Perfecting Your Online Store!” to learn about:

  • The top engagement metrics for each step of the purchasing cycle:
    • Viewing to Carting
    • Carting to Buying
    • Buying to Buying More
  • How to architect and implement a measurement solution using Google Analytics as a measurement platform.
  • How to analyze the data collected for the different users’ segments.
  • This eBook also can be used as an unofficial guide to a best practice implementation of Google’s Universal Analytics.

Don’t forget to read through to the end — I’ve included few take home action items :)

I hope you will enjoy this book as much I did putting it together. Alright my fellow data ninjas, let’s have some fun!

Mar 29
2013

email tagging google analyticsNo matter what the latest marketing channel or marketing buzzword is, email marketing is here to stay and you’d better be paying close attention to it. We’ve covered some basic email marketing strategies in the following parts:part 1, part 2 and part 3. But once you’ve got a solid email marketing program, you’ve gotta be measuring how it did! This post is about email marketing analytics, and in line with our “user-centric” approach to measurement, I’ll share tips with you on how to report not only on traditional email metrics, but also how to see a 360 view of your customers and prospects.

The beauty of the user-centric approach is that your data will be specific to your customer base. You’re not just looking at “open rates” or “click-through rates” in just email marketing, but you’re measuring the entire user experience. This way, you can better decide what works and what doesn’t work based on the interaction with the user. Tracking helps you to constantly improve your email, web and mobile content and approach based on your customer’s overall behavior.

Tracking

First let’s cover the basics. Most email marketing platforms, such as Exact Target, Responsys, iContact, MailChimp, Constant Contact, VerticalResponse, etc. all have integrated tracking. In fact, you don’t even need to set anything up – they’ll have a report ready for you as soon as the email campaign has been sent. In the report, you get pretty decent metrics.
Here is a sample of what you would see from an email-marketing provider:

icontact metrics

  • Open Rate – the number of people who opened your email as well as the total number of times your email was opened.
    • Action: If you have a low open rate, let creative juices flow and come up with more compelling subject lines. Test sending at different times of the day, different days of the week, etc.
  • Click Rate – the number of people who clicked a link in your email as well as the total number of times links were clicked in your email.
    • Action: More than likely, the purpose of your email is to get the reader to take action. More often than not, that’s to click on something and go somewhere on your website. If this metric is low, maybe the quality of your content is not where it needs to be. Maybe the offer is not that compelling. Also, make sure your links and “Calls-to-Actions” are visible; the goal is to get more interaction with customers.
  • Bounces – the number of people who didn’t get your email e.g. their email account could not be reached.
    • Action: To avoid bounces, make sure you collected the list of contacts yourself by having a sign up list on your site, or having them opt-in to receiving special offers from you once they make a purchase.
  • Unsubscribes - the number of people who removed their email from your list, using the subscription management link (email platform will always include this on emails sent through their system) at the bottom of the email.
    • Action: To avoid unsubscribes, make sure the information you are presenting to your customers is relevant to them. When initially creating your list, having subscribers opt-in would most likely decrease this too, since they’ve chosen to hear from you. Most likely if you added someone without their permission, they may not want to be bothered and unsubscribe. Also, maybe you’re sending too many emails? That can be annoying and cause someone to unsubscribe.
  • Forwards - the number of people who forward the email using “Forward to Friend” at the bottom of the email. The email platforms can (should) not capture data of people clicking the actual forward link in their email client.
    • Action: You’re doing something right if this is high, if your customers are forwarding to their friends! Keep it up!
  • Complaints – the number of times a contact reports your message as spam in their email clients.
    • Action: Similar to unsubscribes, to avoid complaints, make sure you are not spamming your customers, don’t send multiple emails a day and make sure you are sending information that is relevant to them. A great way to ensure people don’t unsubscribe is segmenting your contacts into lists of content that is relevant to them, this way they are only receiving content that they signed up for.

Now if you have been reading our blog and follow our Reporting Framework, you know that you should be trending your KPIs, and you could do that easily in Excel and come up with something like this:

email marketing metrics

WOW! What happened to our open rates and click-through’s in Feb!! We can see some issues, so now we can take action!

Post Click – Tracking in Google Analytics

Hopefully, you can tell this is all great information for the email blast itself, but what happens after your email subscribers clicked on the link in your email and landed on your website? This is where Google Analytics comes in.

The email platform will allow you to track the amount of clicks and opens for your blast. But what web analytics platforms such as Google Analytics will do, if you have it set up on your website and have properly tagged your emails, by connecting the two, you get insights on what happens after they’ve clicked the links in your email. See how engaged your email visitor is with your site.

Tagging and Segmentation

Adding a simple tag to the links on the email blast will allow you find out:

  • …if they convert
  • …fill out a form
  • …watch a video
  • …and much more.

This is obviously quite useful, especially if you have eCommerce set up in Google Analytics you can track revenue per email campaign.

In case you are not familiar with the concept of URL tagging, read our post about tracking online marketing campaigns with google analytics to learn more.

Tagging properly to segment your visitors in Google Analytics can be useful when trying to figure out what works best for particular audiences. For example, let’s say you’re having a sale and want to see if “20% off” would capture more attention than “Free Shipping”. The first thing would be to segment your list. Segmenting will allow you to send the same email blast to different sets of people or you can even send two different emails based on your audience to see which performs better. The first email will have a subject line of “20% off your purchase today!” and the second email will be “Buy now & get free shipping.”

Now that you’ve created two blasts, you can add utm tags. A utm tag allows you to make each link unique by adding fields that will appear in Google Analytics reports. To generate this unique link, use E-Nor’s URL builder or another awesome tool for tagging is Campaignalyzer.

When using the URL builder, there are three required fields:

  • Campaign Source is where your traffic is coming from. For example, if you paste the link on “Facebook”, and want to track the visits from there, you can use that as your source. In the case of email tagging, you can use it to identify your segment type. For example, use “leads” for a email blast to your leads list. You can use “prospects”, “customers”, “male”, “female”, etc.
  • Campaign Medium is a marketing medium, or in other words, the “channel” you are using. In this case, it should always be “email” when linking from an email blast.
  • Campaign Name as it says, names your campaign. For example, you can use “April Newsletter” when linking from an email blast for the monthly newsletter in April. You can use the month and year, or even more specifically use the actual day that you are sending it on. You can also use the name of the product you are promoting in the content. If you are sending out newsletters on a regular basis (daily, weekly, monthly, etc.), we would suggest using the date for the campaign name, because it will make things easier when you are looking at reports. Also, if you are testing to see what type of email is getting more conversions, then you will want to use the campaign name to differentiate the emails.

To learn more about url tagging, check out this post on planning before tag :)

Thus, if you use the following, your tagged url will look like below:

  • Url = http://www.yourdomain.com/page.html
  • campaign source=leads
  • campaign medium=email
  • campaign name=april-fools-newsletter
  • Resulting tagged url: http://www.yourdomain.com/page.html?utm_source=leads&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=april-fools-newsletter

Tip: Always test that your tagged urls appear in the browser and in Google Analytics! You never know what can happen…

Reporting

Now that you’ve tagged your email, the data will be found under medium as email traffic for your deep dive analysis.

google analytics medium email

google analytics segmented by email list

You can also trend data over time and see if there are seasonal impacts to your user’s behavior. You can see how many people continued ‘shopping’ on your site and even if they ended up purchasing/converting or not. If you are doing A/B testing on which email to send out to all your customers, you can analyze between both sets of data and then make a decision about which offer resulted in more revenue or micro conversions.

Integrated Reporting

The above reports are all dandy, but we are still looking at metrics in isolation. Analysis and optimization is all about context. What if you like to view the entire experience in one report, you want to see the number of list subscribers, the open rate of a specific campaign and the associated revenue in one report? Sure, you could do it in Excel, but that’ll be a lot of work.

What we recommend is automatically pulling data out of Google Analytics into Tableau and then be ready for some serious slicing and dicing (for now, you still have to pull the email providers data from a csv file and into Tableau). Again, if you follow our articles, here we are featured on the Google blog explaining how to do that).

Here’s what you’ll see, a nice dashboard in Tableau showing key campaign metrics nicely trended for four email newsletters (NL_1, NL_2, NL_3, NL_4):

  • Opens
  • Clicks (of those Opens, how many clicked and visited  your site)
  • Number of transactions
  • Revenue generated
  • (you can also plot Open Rate, Subscriber/list Growth Rate, Time on Site, email visits from Mobile, etc.)

tableau email marketing aggregation

Analysis note: it’s obvious that the Newsletter 4 (NL_4 in red) just tanked in every aspect so address it immediately. It’s also worth noting that while the Newsletter 3 (NL_3 in green) had less transactions than the Newsletter 2 (NL_2 in orange), the revenue number for NL_3 is slightly higher. This indicates that your average order value is higher and whatever you did to upsell or promote higher ticket items worked!!

Advanced Tips

  • Mobile Analytics & Engagement
    • Don’t forget to assess your users mobile experience and expect that more people are using the mobile phones and tablet to access email, browse and shop. Go to your mobile reports and segment by “medium” and select the “ecommerce conversion rate” metric. You’ll quickly see that your mobile users convert at half the rate than your desktop users!! A quick “lost opportunity” analysis will convince your manager to invest into a responsive design for your site or maybe a mobile site.

      email marketing mobile conversion rate

  • Universal Analytics:
    • This will be the subject of a more detailed blog post, but since Universal Analytics is the future, start thinking of what metrics you want to pull into Universal Analytics from your email marketing efforts.  Passing a “user id” (ensure it’s don’t include personally identifying information) is a good start. Work with your email providers to pass the “user id” with the click/visit and then once once the visitor clicks the email link and they are on your site, grab the “user id” and store it in a Custom Dimension. You can then report and export your reports (with user ids) into your BI tool.
  • Filter out auto-respond emails, confirmation emails.
    • Scenario:  A user arrives at your site via an organic search.  The user performs some action which results in him receiving a system generated email containing a link back to the site (for example, an account activation email).  If the user clicks on the link to go back to the site, it’s very likely the medium of the original visit will be overwritten to Referral, particularly if the user is using a web-based email client.  (In the case of Microsoft Outlook, this would be considered a Direct visit, but the medium wouldn’t be overwritten since returning Direct visits don’t override the original medium.)  The “no override” parameter shown below prevents this problem from manifesting. The parameter utm_nooverride=1 can be added to all system generated e-mails, such as registration and password reminder e-mails. For example, a password reset link such as:
      http://mydomain.com/password-reset.htm?resetid=ABC123
      Can be updated to
      http://mydomain.com/password-reset.htm?resetid=ABC123&utm_nooverride=1
  • Attribution & Multi-Channel Funnels (MCF) for your email marketing program:
    • Keep in mind that we all browse many sites before we buy or submit a request for more information. And we are likely to revisit the same site many times before we do so. To see all these touchpoints and how your email channels contributes and assists conversions, make sure you review the MCF reports in in Google Analytics. Here is a snapshot at the Top Conversion Paths along with the number of conversions and conversion values for each path. It takes some of us 5 emails to convert!!

    email marketing mcf

Here you have it! Any other email marketing analytics tips you like to share?

Oct 29
2012

Universal Analytics - Google Analytics Parterns Summit

Today at the Google Analytics Summit, product sessions began with the announcement and introduction of Universal Analytics. These new capabilities will help users integrate their own data into Google Analytics, across multiple devices (including offline!) and allow for a complete 360 degree overview of their entire marketing through this single portal.

Today, marketers are relying on multiple channels to convey and monitor their marketing efforts. With the introduction of Universal Analytics, the task of measuring these efforts is made simple. Now, you have the ability to see the effectiveness of advertising campaigns, sales, retention, etc. in one program, thus giving you a more clear insight into customer experiences.

Universal Analytics is offered through the new Google Analytics Measurement Protocol. This new protocol allows you to send your own digital customer data directly to your Google Analytics account, and shows how users interact with your brand through various platforms like laptops, tablets, smartphones, etc. It also accepts the integration of mobile data from Google’s already developed Mobile App Analytics tool. Another benefit of Universal Analytics is the ability for cross-channel measurement that lets you sync your own data from various marketing channels, thus showing the relationship between the channels that drive conversions and sales. You too can customize the metrics you want leveraging this data integration and develop key reports from this data.

Beyond The Web (and Mobile and Social) Analytics Capabilities:

Universal Analytics

  • Much simplified code and usage of client-side cookies
  • Transition from session based measurement to true visitor measurement
  • Ability to upload your own user ID data (e.g. from CRM systems)
  • Custom Dimensions: ability to upload and associate external data with your GA data

Want more information and benefits of Universal Analytics? We have been beta testing some of these features, so let us know and will be happy to discuss how we can help you leverage these capabilities to impact your business.

And stay tuned to the E-Nor blog for more information about this and other Google Analytics announcements coming this week!

Apr 21
2010

Although every day is a mother’s day, here in the US we dedicate one day especially for her to show our appreciation and thankfulness.  Mother’s Day is just around the corner. As a marketer or a business owner you are getting ready, like all retailers, to kick-off your Mother’s Day campaigns. Last year’s campaign did ok. You didn’t get fired :) , but you didn’t get a promotion either! :( You are a much smarter marketer now and you want to better track your initiatives, assess what channel is performing and fix what is not performing. You are planning all sorts of marketing activities: offline: TV and newspaper ads; online: paid Search, email, banners, social media, and others.

You have your messaging, promotions, copy, creative, and landing pages all ready, and soon you will go live and you have a week to figure out this “tracking, measurement and analytics” business!

No worries! Google Analytics and this post have come to the rescue!!

In this post I will walk you through a process of how to plan and implement a comprehensive external campaign tracking.

Assumptions:

  • You have Google Analytics implemented on your site
  • You have a basic familiarity with URL tagging
  • Last but not least this post also assumes that you are ready and willing to be proactive and you do care about analytics and campaign ROI :)

Prerequisite: Structure & Naming Convention

As you know, the sole purpose of tagging is to differentiate between the different ads and campaigns you are running, so it is very important to agree on the structure and the naming convention as a first step. Here is an example:

As you can see from the chart above, we are running different online and offline ads for our Mother’s Day campaign. In the next section, we are going to tag all these ad’s links with the campaign variables using the URL Builder tool provided by Google.

Email

Email campaigns are one of the most effective ways of attracting visitors to your site especially existing clients. If we don’t tag the emails links with the right campaign tags, visits from emails will be attributed as referral or direct traffic.

How do we tag email links?

  1. Use the URL Builder or CampaignAlyzer to create tagged links
  2. Enter the following variables into the URL builder:
    Website URL: http://www.store.com/
    Campaign Source: newsletter-april
    Campaign Medium: email
    Campaign Name: Mother’s Day 2010
  3. Use the generated link URL in your email (ex. “Visit the Store” button”)

Banner

We will follow the same tagging steps that we used for email campaign to tag our banner campaign:

  1. Use the URL Builder or CampaignAlyzer to create tagged links
  2. Enter the following variables into the URL builder:
    Website URL: http://www.store.com/
    Campaign Source: oprah.com
    Campaign Medium: banner
    Campaign Name: Mother’s Day 2010
  3. Use the generated link URL in your banner (ex. “Shop Now” button”)

Twitter

Social media today is reshaping the online marketing landscape. People are using YouTube, Facebook, Flicker, and Twitter for more than just personal updates and video/picture exchange. There is a huge amount of promotion and branding taking place in these sites and our job in this post is to measure the success of these marketing efforts.

Let’s use Twitter for our Mother’s Day campaign and make sure we tag all links to our site with the proper campaign variables.

How do we tag Twitter links?

  1. Use the URL Builder or CampaignAlyzer to create tagged links
  2. Enter the following variables into the URL builder:
    Website URL: http://www.store.com/
    Campaign Source: twitter
    Campaign Medium: social media
    Campaign Name: Mother’s Day 2010
  3. Shorten the generated link URL using any URL shortening tools (I usually use bit.ly)
  4. Tweet about your promotion using the tiny URL

Paid Search – Google

Thanks God that Google AdWords and Google Analytics are cousins and integrate very well together! Google AdWords has a nice feature called auto-tagging which makes it easy for us to see AdWords campaign information in our Google Analytics reports without any manually tagging.

To learn more about auto-tagging visit this help topic.

How do we enable auto-tagging?

  1. Sign in to your AdWords account
  2. Click on My account tab and select Account preferences
  3. Under Tracking section, click Edit
  4. Check the Destination URL Auto-tagging checkbox
  5. Click “Save changes”

Paid Search – Yahoo

Unlike AdWords, to track Yahoo paid traffic we need to manually tag the destination URL with the campaign variables.

  1. Tag your yahoo ad link using the following variables:
    Website URL: http://www.store.com/
    Campaign Source: yahoo
    Campaign Medium: cpc
    Campaign Term: {OVKey}
    Campaign Name: Mother’s Day 2010
  2. Use the tagged URL for the “Destination URL” field

Paid Search – Bing

Similar to what we did with Yahoo ads, but with the following variables:

  • Website URL: http://www.store.com/
  • Campaign Source: bing
  • Campaign Medium: cpc
  • Campaign Term: {QueryString}
  • Campaign Name: Mother’s Day 2010

Tracking Offline Campaigns

When we talk about tracking campaigns, it is not enough to focus only on online campaigns. We have to include the offline campaigns in our reports for complete analysis. In this section, I will share with you one method of tracking your offline campaigns in Google Analytics in 2 simple steps:

  1. In your offline ads, refer visitors to a page that is unique to the campaign; [www.store.com/mother]
  2. Tag all visitors to the unique page with the campaign variables [source, medium, & campaign name]

How to tag all visitors to www.store.com/mother with the campaign variables?

We will assume that all visitors to the unique landing page [www.store.com/mother] are coming from a specific offline campaign let say the USA Today newspaper. When the USA Today visitors request the promotion URL and before we fire the Google Analytics code, we will refresh the landing page using meta-refresh tag, which update the URL with the campaign UTMs. When The Google Analytics code gets executed after the page refresh, it will see the URL with the campaign UTMs attached to it and will attribute the visit as desired.

How do we tag destination URLs?

  1. Go to the URL Builder
  2. Enter the following variables into the URL builder:
    Website URL: http://www.store.com/mother
    Campaign Source: usa-today
    Campaign Medium: newspaper
    Campaign Name: Mother’s Day 2010
  3. Add the following code to the header of landing page before the Google Analytics tracking code

    <head>
    <link rel=”canonical” href=”http://www.store.com/mother” />
    <meta http-equiv=”refresh” content=”1;URL=http://www.store.com/?utm_source=usa-today&utm_medium=newspaper&utm_campaign=Mother’s%2BDay%202010″>
    </head>

Analyzing the data:

Now as we had all tags in place, it is time for deep dive analysis into the “Mother’s Day 2010″ campaign. I suggest that you isolate the campaigns’ visits by using advanced custom segment and look at this unique segment across reports.

Creating Custom Advanced Segmentation

  1. Sign in to your Google Analytics account
  2. Advanced Segments > Create a new advanced segment
  3. Add the following dimensions:

Viewing Reports (Show me the money!!)

Now, you are ready to conduct analysis based on the customized segment. You can look at the traffic sources report and see how many people purchased and from which medium:

From the first look at the ecommerce numbers above, we can confirm that:

  • The TV campaign has the highest conversion rate
  • The newspaper campaign was not as effective as other campaigns
  • Social media has the highest ROI (Return on Investment)

Click on the dropdown menu below for more marketing campaign tagging examples.

If you like this exercise and you were able to extract some valuable insights for your business, apply the same concept for the upcoming Father’s Day, which is on June 20th here in the US and do a comparison between the users’ purchasing behavior in these two very special occasions.

Share your findings and happy analyzing and drop us a comment below!

Notes:

  • For advanced users and those interested in multi-channel attribution, you can make use of the the Multiple Custom Variables (MCV) feature in Google Analytics
  • If you are running social media and online viral marketing activities and you are active in blogging, on Twitter and Facebook, you should include “off-site” measurements in your overall campaign analysis. In addition, be sure to dedicate resources to listen and participate in the social conversations around your brand, products and campaigns

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